Beauty and Wellbeing interviewed our resident micronutritionist, Dr Nara Nairi

 

Here is the full interview

Author: Marie-Laure de Clermont-Tonnerre

Dr. Nara Nairi has had quite the education; she first attended the Faculty of Medicine in Moscow (Russia), before going onto the Faculty of Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences of Paris (France), and finally the Faculty of Medicine of Burgundy (France). At the latter, she was awarded a Postgraduate Diploma in Micronutrition. She started her clinic in London as the first graduated specialist in the UK.

In addition to running her practice, she has also begun development programs for healthcare professionals, giving lectures on micronutrition, and taken part in medical congresses and seminars, writing articles all the while.

We asked her to share more about the benefits of micronutrition.

What is micronutrition?

Micronutrition describes the regulated intake of micronutrients (e.g. vitamins, trace elements, fatty acids, probiotics, prebiotics) via a diverse and balanced diet. The micronutrition approach focuses on personalized prevention, but can also help fight pathogens.

With spring around the corner, what advice do you have for us to make up for the nutritional deficiencies we may have accumulated during the winter?

First of all, try to take advantage of the daylight as much as possible, and vary your diet by consuming the season’s fruits and vegetables, as they provide a natural source of vitamins and micronutrients. Do not hesitate to get tests done to pinpoint your dietary deficiencies, and then to find the best adapted solution for your needs.

How do you use micronutrition to prepare the skin for exposure to the sun?

Fifteen minutes of sun exposure per day is beneficial.

The sun is essential and helps us produce vitamin D, which plays an important role in supporting the immune system, boosting our mood, preventing cardiovascular diseases and even cancer.

Fifteen minutes of sun exposure per day is beneficial. However, in order to prevent and reduce the harmful effects of a prolonged exposure to the sun (variable for different types of skin), try antioxidants and plants like Polypodium Leucotomos.

Can you balance the intestinal flora via micronutrition?

Pharmacies and health food stores offer a lot of probiotics products and it’s hard to choose.

Go for the most natural ones. The effectiveness of probiotics depends on two factors: dosage and choice of bacterial strains. It’s true that it is sometimes hard to choose.

Make sure that the daily dosage has at least tens of billions of bacteria.

Try to investigate to see if there has been research published on a specific probiotic, and if the physiological benefits have been scientifically recognized. Make sure that the daily dosage has at least tens of billions of bacteria. Finally, I recommend keeping them at room temperature and lactose-free.

Before the summer, we all want to have a flat belly. Any secrets?

You can correct an imbalance in intestinal flora by taking probiotics and pursuing an adapted food diet.

Health starts in the gut. It is essential to take care of this organ by eating vegetables rich in prebiotic fibers (artichokes, asparagus, chicory root), and fermented food (kefir, miso, sauerkraut, Kombucha tea). You can correct an imbalance in intestinal flora by taking probiotics and pursuing an adapted food diet.

Micronutrition helps to establish a personalized dietary program with supplements that can help correct or prevent metabolic irregularities.

Can you lose weight easily via micronutrition?

Weight gain is often the result of an imbalance between intakes and energy used. This imbalance can result from excessive food intake, but it may also be due to genetics, hormonal disorders, or a medication’s side effects. Micronutrition helps to establish a personalized dietary program with supplements that can help correct or prevent metabolic irregularities.

Can micronutrition help women deal with premenopausal and menopausal symptoms?

Absolutely. Micronutrition can help reduce hot flashes, insomnia, mood swings, and also maintain the bone capital, which has a tendency to become fragile at this time. It protects the skin from dryness and prevents weight gain.

Can micronutrition provide a solution for acne and eczema?

The following supplements help to achieve healthy skin: borage oil to prevent skin dryness, zinc to boost the system, and vitamin C to fight free radicals.

It can be a good daily ally. Healthy skin is a sign of internal harmony. Once again, I must insist on how critical it is to maintain a good diet and healthy intestinal flora. The following supplements help achieve healthy skin: borage oil to prevent skin dryness, zinc to boost the system, and vitamin C to fight free radicals.

What are your favorite spring vegetables?

My favorites are fresh peas, asparagus, radishes, spinach, and rhubarb.

How can vegetarians avoid iron deficiency and protein deficiencies?

They should maintain a rich and varied diet that includes legumes (e.g. white beans, chickpeas), which provide proteins and iron. Another good source of iron is Spinach, boiled and served with sesame seeds, as a creamy soup mixed with other vegetables, or delivered raw in salads (even though cooked spinach is better for its absorbable iron content).

– See more at: http://beautyandwellbeing.com/well-being/interview-well-being/dr-nara-nairi-micronutritionist/#sthash.G2fd3frO.dpuf

Dr Nara Nairi is available for consultations at Make Me Feel on Monday mornings. To book please call 0208 675 1207 or email info@makemefeel.co.uk

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